Candidate Surveys Make the Arts Matter in Elections

The Challenge: How does a well-known arts council reinvigorate its arts education messaging?

The Strategy: Seize moments of momentum like a statewide Candidate Survey Project in a big election year.

The Story: The Cultural Council of Santa Cruz County has a long history of support for arts education, beginning in 1980 when it launched the nationally recognized SPECTRA program (Special Teaching Resources in the Arts) in response to Proposition 13.

Today, according to a recent white paper by the Council, the community has “the local expertise and skills needed to make a major impact in this field, numerous case studies to draw upon, a supportive community of parents, teachers, school administrators and arts organizations and hundreds of teachers, artists, and administrators who have received quality professional development in arts education.” Yet, like so many communities, its arts education offerings are also dependent on the ebb and flow of financial resources.

WHERE DO YOU THINK @#$%& ARTISTS COME FROM?

 

Remarks from Ann Morhauser, CEO and Designer of Annieglass and one of the hosts of our local advocacy launch breakfast in Santa Cruz County.

Artists do not fall fully-formed from the sky ready to create the next Mona Lisa or your next smart phone, computer, gadget, cancer cure, bridge, car, sunscreen, seat belt, MRI, solar panel, wine, ATM… They need to be taught, trained, nurtured, given room, space and time to develop their own personal vocabulary to be able to interpret and communicate their vision.

Any invention requires more than engineering. Innovation requires imagination, the ability to construct and deconstruct unhindered, analysis, and creativity. Vital to any sort of artistic development is both the nerve to carry it out and the freedom to fail.

School Board Saves Its Arts Program by Establishing it as 'Core Curriculum'

 

Arts education hasn't historically been valued as a "must-have" in nationwide school districts. In fact, it's often one of the most popular cuts to be made when cash-strapped states want to decrease spending. That's because painting, music, and theater are generally considered “extras” or entertaining complements to education, but not core subjects. That view is shifting as educators open up to the idea that learning art-related subjects makes kids better academically as well as personally.

Los Al Arts Alliance Welcomes New VAPA

 

Amber Lee-Ruiz is the new Director of Educational Services for LAUSD, which includes being the Visual and Performing Arts Coordinator.  She came to Los Al in July with knowledge and experience in LA County's "Arts for All" and a firm commitment to the arts.  She will serve as the liaison for the Los Alamitos Alliance for Arts Education.  We look forward to working together to promote arts education to all of the students in Los Al.

More press after our successful launch breakfast event!

Press for our lauch breakfast event!

Arts Heavy Pre-School Helps Students Grow Emotionally.

Newly published research suggests low-income kids are more likely to develop these all-important abilities if they attend a unique preschool program that integrates education and the arts.

California Alliance for Arts Education voted to recommend the Alliance endorse both funding initiatives on this November’s ballot

 

Reimagining the Arts and Education

Juilliard scholar Edward Bilous eloquently presents the case for a comprehensive, longitudinal arts education in this April 2012 lecture.  He beautifully articulates the unique role that arts play in engaging and nurturing our creative intelligence, providing a meta-learning experience, and reinforce the interconnects of the learning process.  His argument that the role of education has shifted from information transfer to information processing because of technology advances is insightful.  He ends by explaining that, "Imagining is more important than accumulating and creating is more important than consuming."  

You can read the full transcript of his lecture or watch the video.  It runs just over 23 minutes.

http://www.juilliard.edu/journal/2011-2012/1205/articles/schuman-lecture.php

Arts Heavy Pre-School Helps Students Grow Emotionally

 

Newly published research suggests low-income kids are more likely to develop these all-important abilities if they attend a unique preschool program that integrates education and the arts.

The arts-rich curriculum produced more “positive emotions such as interest, happiness and pride, and greater growth in emotion regulation across the school year,” reports West Chester University psychologist Eleanor D. Brown.These results are particularly significant, she adds, given “the critical importance of children’s social-emotional readiness to learn.”

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